Schedule

Keynotes

We are pleased to announce that Joanne Hammond will be providing one of the keynotes for the #beyond150CA Twitter Conference.  Her presentation is titled “History In Deed: Stories to Recall, Repair, Rebalance”

Joanne Hammond is an archaeologist and anthropologist in BC, where she lives and works in the unceded territories of the Secwepemc, Syilx and Nlaka’pamux Nations. Her field and policy work supports community-based cultural heritage governance according to the principles of the United Nations Declaration in the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). She’s a program advisor with Simon Fraser University’s graduate professional program in heritage management, and serves on the Kamloops Heritage Commission. Joanne is active in outreach with schools, community groups, professional organizations and governments to educate learners of all ages about Indigenous archaeological heritage and the history of Indigenous peoples and the Canadian state. In support of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action, she creates educational content on archaeology and decolonial histories for K-12 BC classrooms and for public and corporate settings. Joanne believes that we can craft socially responsible and morally defensible approaches to heritage research, interpretation, and education that can produce outstanding human stories. Joanne’s on the web at republicofarchaeology.ca and on Twitter @KamloopsArchaeo.

Our second keynote will be Helen Knott. Helen’s presentation, “History, Truth, and Indigenous Diaspora” will occur Friday August 25, 2017 from 11:15am-12:15pm ET. Her presentation abstract is as follows: History is a fickle word that can taste bitter or sweet depending on the tongue on which it is placed but this heavily depends on the tongue that tells the story. Canadian history has long since been dominated by a one sided colonial version of what the “truth” is and consequently has widened the gap in regards to reaching reconciliation. History further extends itself past books and records as Indigenous truth, and ways of being and knowing, are tied to land bases.

Speaking from a Dane Zaa and mixed perspective, Helen Knott discusses how stories, history, and the future are connected to land bases specifically within Dane Zaa territory located in Northeastern British Columbia, an area heavily impacted by resource extraction and development. In areas that experience heavy resource development, resulting in mass reconfiguration of landscapes and accessibility, Indigenous diaspora manifests. Indigenous diaspora creating the feeling of being “out of place while in place”, a context that is continually being created within “post-colonial” Canada. All of this is rooted in how we see history and truth.  Helen poses the question, “if our history, present, and future are intrinsically tied to our land, how can we reach reconciliation if colonial stories in the forms of buildings, pipelines, and reservoirs are continually being written overtop of our own existing history?”

Helen Knott is of Dane Zaa, Nehiyaw, and mixed Euro descent from Prophet River First Nations living in Fort St. John, BC. She is currently completing her Master’s Degree in First Nations Studies and focusing her research on the connection between violence Indigenous lands and violence against Indigenous women. Helen has been involved with upholding her traditional responsibility in her traditional territory by defending against the mega hydroelectric dam project, Site C, for several years. She has practiced social work in the North Eastern region of British Columbia, knowing that wellness and healing is just as important as protecting land. She has released various poetry videos and video projects regarding violence, Indigenous healing, and Indigenous land rights through CBC Arts/Short Docs, as well as independently. Helen has published other written content ranging from fictional pieces to academic articles and maintains a blog, Reclaim the Warrior. She is on Twitter at @helen_knott.

Conference Schedule

*All times are in ET*
The Twitter accounts of the presenters have been linked in the schedule below. Presentation abstracts have been compiled in a Google Doc.

Thursday August 24, 2017

11:15am-12:15pm Joanne Hammond KEYNOTE: “History In Deed: Stories to Recall, Repair, Rebalance”
12:15-12:30pm BREAK
12:30-1:00pm Allana Mayer Reclaiming Lacrosse
1:00-1:30pm Alison Nagy Archives for Everyone
1:30-2:00pm Karen Pearlston Lesbians and Family Law in 1970s Canada
2:00-2:30pm BREAK
2:30-3:00pm Graphic History Collective Remember l Resist l Redraw: Activist Art to Challenge Canada 150
3:00-3:30pm Jonathan Weir A Celebration of Consumerism: @Canada1504sale and the Commercialization of #canada150
3:30-4:00pm Dominique Banoun “We are free and equal among brothers”
4:00-4:30pm Lindsay Doris Bilodeau More than a Game: Hockey as a Witness to Canadian Identity Formation
4:30-5:00pm Jessica Dewitt Average Man’s Wilderness: Algonquin and Its Timber
5:00-6:00pm BREAK
6:00-6:30pm Hailey Venn “The faculty of making everyone feel at home”: Gender divides, united across two rural BC communities
6:30-7:00pm Julia Gossard Filles du Roi: Reproductive Vessels
7:00-7:30pm Madeline Knickerbocker “Ilhtsel t’áméx te’í:lé kw’els ílh stl’ítl’qelh”: Stó:lō Weavers and Settler Anthropology in the 1960s

Friday August 25, 2017

11:15-12:15pm KEYNOTE:  Helen Knott
12:15-12:30pm BREAK
12:30-1:00pm Alan MacEachern The Canthropocene
1:00-1:30pm Sara Janes Records We Are Not Proud Of: Archival Outreach and Controversial Materials
1:30-2:00pm Rachel Guitman A.R. Kaufman and the Parents’ Information Bureau: Eugenics in Ontario
2:00-2:30pm BREAK
2:30-3:00pm Claire Campbell Founding conceits in an era of climate change
3:00-3:30pm Anne Janhunen ‘The Holiday Spirit Will Prevail’: Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Erasure in Ontario’s ‘Cottage Country’
3:30-4:00pm Sarah King Be…In This Place: Cornerstones of Atlantic Canadian Citizenship
4:00-4:30pm Jessica Knapp #ThisisCanadasHistory
4:30-5:00pm Daniel Poitras Unheard voices on the campus: the story of the foreign students in the post-war era
5:00-6:00pm BREAK
6:00-6:30pm Jessica DeWitt and Sarah York-Bertram Too Supportive: Fostering Allied Behaviour on Social Media
6:30-7:00pm Allison Mills Rights and Responsibilities: Indigenous Critiques of Linked Open Data
7:00-7:30pm Laure Spake and Derek O’Neil Reconciliation one step and one sign at a time: shifting priorities in memorializing the past around Vancouver, BC

 

Discours liminaire

Nous avons le plaisir de vous annoncer que Joanne Hammond donner un des discours liminaires de la Conférence Twitter #beyond150CA. Sa presentation est intitulée History in Deed: Stories to Recall, Repair, Rebalance.

Joanne Hammond est archéologue et anthropologue en Colombie-Britannique, où elle habite et travaille sur un territoire non concédé des nations Secwepemc, Syilx et Nlaka’pamux. Son travail de législation et de terrain encourage la gouvernance locale de l’héritage culturel selon les principes de la Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones (DNUDPU). Elle est conseillère dans le programme professionnel des diplômés de l’Université Fraser, et siège sur la Kamloops Heritage Commision.  Joanne est active dans sa sensibilisation dans les écoles, les groupes communautaires, les organisations professionnelles et les gouvernements pour renseigner tout le monde sur les vestiges archéologiques autochtones et sur l’histoire des peoples autochtones et du gouvernement canadien. En réaction aux appels à l’action de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation, elle crée du contenu pédagogique sur l’archéologie et l’histoire post-coloniale dans les classes de la maternelle à la 12e année de Colombie-Britannique, et des événements publics et corporatifs. Joanne a la conviction que nous pouvons créer des approches socialement et moralement responsables pour la recherche en histoire, l’interprétation et l’éducation qui peuvent produire des histoires humaines remarquables.

Joanne se trouve en ligne au republicofarchaeology.ca et sur Twitter @KamloopsArchaeo.

Histoire, Vérité et Daspora autochtone

« Histoire » est un mot capricieux qui peut être aigre ou doux selon l’auditeur, mais qui dépend beaucoup de la langue qui le prononce. L’histoire canadienne a longtemps été dominée par une version coloniale univoque de ce qu’est la « vérité », et celle-ci a semé des embûches dans le chemin vers la réconciliation. L’histoire dépasse les simples livres et archives écrites, car la vérité autochtone, tout comme la mode de vie et la manière d’apprendre, est liée au territoire.

En empruntant une perspective Dane-zaa et mixte, Helen Knott nous raconte comment des récits, l’histoire et l’avenir sont liés au territoire, spécialement dans le territoire des Dane-zaa situé dans le nord-est de la Colombie-Britannique. C’est un territoire fortement touché par le développement urbain résultant de l’extraction de ressources. Dans des lieux qui subissent un tel développement, qui entraîne une profonde modification dans le paysage et dans l’accessibilité à ces territoires, la diaspora autochtone se manifeste. Cette diaspora souffre du sentiment d’être « hors de chez soi tout en étant chez soi », un contexte qui a continuellement été créé dans le Canada postcolonial. Tout cela trouve racine dans notre vision de l’histoire et de la vérité. Helen pose cette question : « Si notre histoire, notre présent et notre avenir sont intimement liés à notre territoire, comment pouvons en arriver à une réconciliation, si les histoires coloniales représentées par les édifices, les oléoducs et les réservoirs sont sans cesse construites par-dessus notre propre histoire ? »

Biographie

Helen Knott est une descendante Dane-zaa, Nehiyaw et européenne de la Nation autochtone de Prophet River, et vit à Fort St John, C.-B. Elle est présentement candidate à la maîtrise en Études autochtones, et oriente sa recherche sur les liens entre la violence infligée aux territoires autochtones et la violence infligée aux femmes antichtones. Helen a fait preuve de respect envers ses responsabilités dans la préservation du territoire traditionnel de son peuple en s’opposant au projet d’un immense barrage hydroélectrique, le Site C, pendant plusieurs années. Elle a effectué du travail social dans la région Nord-Est de la Colombie-Britannique, sachant que le bien-être et la guérison sont tout aussi importants que de protéger le territoire. Elle a publié plusieurs vidéos poétiques et de projets vidéo portant sur la violence, la guérison des Autochtones et les droits territoriaux des Autochtones via CBC Arts / Short Docs, et de manière indépendante. Helen a fait paraître d’autres écrits, de récits fictifs aux recherches scientifiques, et tient un blogue, Reclaim the Warrior.

Horaire de la conférence

*Toutes les heures sont selon l’heure de l’est*
Les liens vers les comptes Twitter des présentateurs ont été insérés dans l’horaire ci-dessous.

Jeudi 24 août 2017

11h15-12h15 Joanne Hammond Discours liminaire: History In Deed: Stories to Recall, Repair, Rebalance [Histoire comme acte: histoire de souvenance, de réparation et de rééquilibre]
12h15-12h30 PAUSE
12h30-13h00 Allana Mayer Reclaiming Lacrosse [Se réapproprier Lacrosse]
13h00-13h30 Alison Nagy Archives for Everyone [Archives pour tous]
13h30-14h00 Karen Pearlston Lesbians and Family Law in 1970s Canada [Lesbiennes et Loi sur la Famille dans le Canada des années 1970]
2h00-2h30 PAUSE
2h30-3h00 Graphic History Collective Remember | Resist | Redraw: Activist Art to Challenge Canada 150 [Se souvenir | Résister | Redessiner: l’art activiste pour remettre en question Canada 150]
3h00-3h30 Jonathan Weir A Celebration of Consumerism: @Canada1504sale and the Commercialization of #canada150 [Une celebration de la Société de consummation: @Canada150avendre et la commercialisation de @Canada150]
3h30-4h00 Dominique Banoun “We are free and equal among brothers” [« Nous sommes libres et égaux parmi des frères »]
4h00-4h30 Lindsay Doris Bilodeau More than a Game: Hockey as a Witness to Canadian Identity Formation [Plus qu’un jeu: le hockey comme témoin de la formation de l’identité canadienne]
4h30-5h00 Jessica Dewitt Average Man’s Wilderness: Algonquin and Its Timber [La nature de l’homme quelconque : L’Algonquin et son bois]
5h00-6h00 PAUSE
6h00-6h30 Hailey Venn “The faculty of making everyone feel at home”: Gender divides, united across two rural BC communities [« Le pouvoir de faire sentir tout le monde chez soi » : la division des genres, unie dans deux communautés  rurales de C.-B.]
6h30-7h00 Julia Gossard Filles du Roi: Reproductive Vessels [Filles du Roy : des vaisseaux de reproduction]
7h00-7h30 Madeline Knickerbocker “Ilhtsel t’áméx te’í:lé kw’els ílh stl’ítl’qelh”: Stó:lō Weavers and Settler Anthropology in the 1960s [Ilhtsel t’áméx te’í:lé kw’els ílh stl’ítl’qelh”: les tisserands Stó:lō et l’anthropologie coloniale dans les années 1960]

 

Friday August 25, 2017

11h15-12h15 Discours liminaire: Helen Knott
12h15-12h30 PAUSE
12h30-13h00 Alan MacEachern The Canthropocene [Le « Canthropocène »]
1h00-1h30 Sara Janes Records We Are Not Proud Of: Archival Outreach and Controversial Materials [Des enregistrements dont nous ne sommes pas fiers: le rayonnement des archives et le matériel controversé]
1h30-2h00 Rachel Guitman A.R. Kaufman and the Parents’ Information Bureau: Eugenics in Ontario [A.R. Kaufman et le Bureau d’information parentale : l’eugénisme en Ontario]
2h00-2h30 PAUSE
2h30-3h00 Claire Campbell Founding conceits in an era of climate change [Des prétentions fondatrices dans une ère de changements climatiques]
3h00-3h30 Anne Janhunen ‘The Holiday Spirit Will Prevail’: Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Erasure in Ontario’s ‘Cottage Country’ [« L’esprit des Fêtes vaincra »: le colonialisme du colon et l’effacement de l’Autochtone dans le Cottage Country ontarien]
3h30-4h00 Sarah King Be…In This Place: Cornerstones of Atlantic Canadian Citizenship [Être… à cet endroit : Les pierres angulaires de la citoyenneté canadienne atlantique]
4h00-4h30 Jessica Knapp #ThisisCanadasHistory [#VoilaHistoireCanada]
4h30-5h00 Daniel Poitras Unheard voices on the campus: the story of the foreign students in the post-war era [Des voix ignorées sur le campus : l’histoire des étudiants étrangers dans l’après-guerre]
5h00-6h00 PAUSE
6h00-6h30 Jessica DeWitt et Sarah York-Bertram Too Supportive: Fostering Allied Behaviour on Social Media [Trop solidaire : favoriser le comportement des Alliés sur les medias sociaux]
6h30-7h00 Allison Mills Rights and Responsibilities: Indigenous Critiques of Linked Open Data [Droits et devoirs : les critiques autochtones du Web des données]
7h00-7h30 Laure Spake et Derek O’Neil Reconciliation one step and one sign at a time : shifting priorities in memorializing the past around Vancouver, BC [La réconciliation, un pas et un signe à la fois : changer les priorités dans la commémoration du passé près de Vancouver, C.-B.]

 

Advertisements